FL HB 713 Summary for Mold Retated Services

March 11, 2010

FL Mold Related Services Summary
John Lapotaire

A line by line helpful overview of the FL HB 713 as it makes its way through its final committee.

Mold Services Requirements

652 Mold Related Services

656 (2) The Legislature finds it necessary in the interest of

657 the public safety and welfare, to prevent damage to real and

658 personal property, to avert economic injury to the residents of

659 this state, and to regulate persons and companies that hold

660 themselves out to the public as qualified to perform mold

661related services.

672 Examinations

673 (1) A person desiring to be licensed as a mold assessor or

674 mold remediator must shall apply to the department after

675 satisfying the examination requirements of this part to take a

676 licensure examination.

682 (a)1. For a mold remediator, at least a 2-year associate

683 of arts degree, or the equivalent, with at least 30 semester

684 hours in microbiology, engineering, architecture, industrial

685 hygiene, occupational safety, or a related field of science from

686 an accredited institution and a minimum of 1 year of documented

687 field experience in a field related to mold remediation; or

688 2. A high school diploma or the equivalent with a minimum

689 of 4 years of documented field experience in a field related to

690 mold remediation.

691 (b)1. For a mold assessor, at least a 2-year associate of

692 arts degree, or the equivalent, with at least 30 semester hours

693 in microbiology, engineering, architecture, industrial hygiene,

694 occupational safety, or a related field of science from an

695 accredited institution and a minimum of 1 year of documented

696 field experience in conducting microbial sampling or

697 investigations; or

698 2. A high school diploma or the equivalent with a minimum

699 of 4 years of documented field experience in conducting

700 microbial sampling or investigations.

Insurance

860 (1) A mold assessor shall maintain general liability and

861 errors and omissions for both preliminary and postremediation

862 mold assessment insurance coverage in an amount of at least $1

863 million

Grandfather Clause

866 468.8423 Grandfather clause.-

867 (1) A person who performs mold assessment or mold

868 remediation as defined in this part may qualify for licensure to

869 be licensed by the department as a mold assessor or mold

870 remediator if the person submits his or her application to the

871 department by March 1, 2011, whether postmarked or delivered by

872 that date, and if the person: meets the licensure requirements

873 of this part by July 1, 2010.

874 (a) Is certified as a mold assessor or mold remediator by

875 a state or national association that requires, for such

876 certification, successful completion of a proctored examination

877 on mold assessment or mold remediation, as applicable, and

878 completes at least 60 hours of education on mold assessment or

879 at least 30 hours of education on mold remediation, as

880 applicable; or

881 (b) At the time of application, has at least 3 years of

882 experience as a mold assessor or mold remediator. To establish

883 the 3 years of experience, an applicant must submit at least 40

884 mold assessments or remediation invoices prepared by the

885 applicant.

John P. Lapotaire, CIEC

Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant

Microshield Environmental Services, LLC

www.Microshield-ES.com


Status of the “Florida Mold Law” HB 713

March 5, 2010

The Bill has made its way through committee and is well on its way to becoming a Law. Below is the documented progress and committee vote.

HB 713 – Regulation of Professions
GENERAL BILL by Workman

Regulation of Professions: Assigns certain programs to regulation by Division of Professions of DBPR; specifies that department is responsible for regulation of certain professions & administration of certain examinations; limits applicant’s review of failed examination questions; prohibits examinee whose examination materials are confiscated from taking another examination under certain circumstances; authorizes temporary professional licensure of spouses of active duty members of U.S. Armed Forces under certain circumstances; revises grounds for discipline of professional licensees; authorizes publication of certain legal advertisements & notices on department ‘s website in lieu of publication in newspaper;

revises licensing requirements for home inspectors, mold assessors, & mold remediators;

deletes requirements for certificates of authorization for corporations or partnerships offering home inspection or mold-related services; exempts from punishment certain unlicensed activity occurring before specified date; extends time for licensure of home inspectors, mold assessors, & mold remediators under certain grandfather provisions & revises such provisions; revises regulatory exemption for intern or resident veterinarians; revises licensing requirements for real estate brokers & sales associates & cosmetologists; revises membership of Florida Real Estate Appraisal Board; assigns departmental unit responsible for regulation of carbon monoxide hazards in certain public lodging establishments; authorizes department to issue & enforce notices to cease & desist violations of provisions regulating pugilistic exhibitions; provides for issuance of special alcoholic beverage licenses to certain movie theaters & limits on-premises sale of alcoholic beverages therein to certain areas & times.
Effective Date: July 1, 2010

Effective Date: July 1, 2010
Last Event: Favorable with CS by Insurance, Business & Financial Affairs Policy Committee on Wednesday, March 03, 2010 4:00 PM
Bill Number: 0713
Bill Name: HB 713
Action: Favorable With Committee Substitute
Committee: Insurance, Business & Financial Affairs Policy Committee
Location: Webster Hall (212 Knott)
Duration: 2.00
Date: 3/3/2010 2:00:00 PM
Sponsor: Workman
Subject: Regulation of Professions

Y Domino Y Grady (Y) Long Y Patterson Y Wood
Y Eisnaugle Y Hays Y Nehr Y Rader Y Workman
Y Flores Y Jenne Y Nelson N Taylor

Total Yeas: 12 Total Nays: 1 Total Missed: 0 Total Votes: 13

Bill History:
Event Time Member Committee
Favorable with CS by Insurance, Business & Financial Affairs Policy Committee Wednesday, March 03, 2010 4:00 PM Insurance, Business & Financial Affairs Policy Committee
1st Reading Tuesday, March 02, 2010 10:50 PM
Added to Insurance, Business & Financial Affairs Policy Committee agenda Monday, March 01, 2010 4:26 PM Insurance, Business & Financial Affairs Policy Committee
Now in Insurance, Business & Financial Affairs Policy Committee Thursday, January 28, 2010 2:54 PM Insurance, Business & Financial Affairs Policy Committee
Referred to General Government Policy Council Thursday, January 28, 2010 2:54 PM General Government Policy Council
Referred to Government Operations Appropriations Committee Thursday, January 28, 2010 2:54 PM Government Operations Appropriations Committee
Referred to Insurance, Business & Financial Affairs Policy Committee Thursday, January 28, 2010 2:54 PM Insurance, Business & Financial Affairs Policy Committee
Filed Tuesday, January 19, 2010 9:37 AM Workman

John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
http://www.Microshield-ES.com


What is a Professional and Informative Mold Report?

March 4, 2010

A professionally prepared Mold Report should clearly answer the following questions:

1.Is there a mold or IAQ problem?
2.What was the cause?
3.Where is the problem source?
4.What containment and cleaning are needed?
5.What building repairs are needed to prevent future problems?
6.How will we assure that the field investigation work is properly done?
7.How will we assure that the mold test lab work was actually collected by an expert?
A mold test lab report can produce a lot of information but it does not answer any of those questions.

A true mold inspector should have the ability to do more than hit the on switch of the sampling pump and hand the client a lab report.

Are Mold Lab Reports Useful Without a Visual Inspection?

A mold report from the laboratory which simply offers some counts or numbers or culture results is not a good value. Not when the mold inspector was supposed to perform a “screening inspection” for mold, but did not perform a thorough visual inspection of the home or office.

A superficial mold test risks leaving the client with ambiguous results, or even if the test suggests that a problem mold is present, the client has no idea where the problem is, if any, and what to do about it.

If you suspect that there is a mold problem in your home or office you need to know the following:

1.Is there a mold, allergen, or similar environmental problem in the building?
2.If there is a problem, where is it and how big is it?
3.What does the lab work indicate about the level of risk to occupants or workers? Are we looking at a “cosmetic-only” concern?
4.Is a mold remediation protocol necessary?
5.What is the extent of demolition or cleaning needed, and based on the lab results, what is the level of containment and care needed?
6.What needs to be changed or repaired in the home or office so that problems don’t recur?
7.After the cleanup has been completed, was it proper and complete?
A professionally prepared mold report must be useful:

In other words, in exchange for being paid a substantial professional fee to investigate a building, a mold inspector should provide accurate and useful diagnostic and prescriptive information to his or her client, and should include not only an identification of problematic mold, but an indication of where the problem is, how big it is, and what work is needed to remove it – a mold remediation protocol.

A Qualified Ethical Mold Inspector or Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant should interview the client carefully before the inspection to assist in deciding if such a costly inspection and test process is really appropriate and cost-justified.

In cases where there are no occupants at special risk of mold-related illness or respiratory illness; where there is no building leak history, and where no substantial mold is visible or suspected, a mold investigation may not be appropriate. Instead an indoor environmental assessment for allergy or asthma triggers would be more appropriate.

We get a lot of calls from people asking us to help them interpret their “mold inspection report.” What we often learn is that there was no actual mold inspection conducted.

The “inspector” simply collected some test samples, sent them to a mold test lab, and returned the mold lab test report to the client with no supporting explanation or laboratory report interpretation.

That sort of “mold inspection” is not very helpful as no one can really interpret what the report means.

Adding difficulty to interpreting a mold lab test report is the usual practice by the mold test “expert” of omitting any description of the mold test conditions.

1.Was testing passive – did the inspector tiptoe into a room and collect a tape or air or culture sample?
2.Or was testing active – were rooms occupied by active people, were fans running, were windows open or shut?
3.What were the other indoor environmental conditions that are vital to an indoor environmental assessment such as temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and particulate levels?
4.Was the home at a positive or negative pressure?
5.Was the A/C running?
6.Were any windows open?
7.How many people were coming and going in the home?
8.Pets?
9.House plants?
10.Cooking?
Without knowing more about these site conditions, without an actual detailed visual inspection for causes of or evidence of mold, without taking a site history and client history and adding that the level of airborne particles in buildings varies enormously from minute to minute depending on these conditions, interpreting your “mold lab test report” is simply not possible.

These mold laboratory reports have some great graphs but they also have

1.no building inspection,
2.no building history of leaks or observed mold problems
3.no client history of building related complaints,
4.no mold risk assessment,
5.no interpretation of the lab’s findings, and contradictory indications.
6.so … No one knows what to do next.
What’s worse all mold laboratory reports have a disclaimer that states something to the effect of;

The Laboratory bears no responsibility for sample collection activities or analytical method limitations. Interpretation and use of test results are the responsibility of the client

or

The client is solely responsible for the use and interpretation of these recommended action guidelines.

And the inspectors often add in their agreements the following helpful clause;

The client is solely responsible for the use and interpretation of the test results and reports requested from home inspector. The inspector is not able to assess the degree of any potential hazard resulting from the materials and areas analyzed. Therefore, we respectfully suggest that you review this report with your personal physician or health care person(s) for information that may affect the inhabitants of the home.

In other words, in exchange for being paid a professional fee to investigate a building, the mold inspector should provide accurate and useful diagnostic and prescriptive information to his or her client; not state that he or she is not responsible for the interpretation of the sample results that they have collected.

A Professional Mold Investigation is much more than the collection of samples.

Unless the sample collection was combined with an expert visual inspection of the building, one cannot be certain of the extent of mold or other particle contamination in a building.

Similarly, without an expert visual inspection one cannot determine if a sample accurately represents all of the molds present in the building.

A competent report should identify, right up front, what is important and what needs to be done.

It should support these opinions with competent detail and professional, reliable lab work.

A professional mold inspection report is much mor that handing the client a lab report.

John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
www.Microshield-ES.com


Bioaerosol Laboratory Result Interpretation

March 4, 2010

There are no government-issued numerical standards for mold interpretation. However, use the following arbitrary numbers for guidance in interpreting microbial survey results.

Bioaerosol

•1,000 CFU/m3 Active Growth/Sporulation
•>5,000 CFU/m3 Very Active Growth/Sporulation
Our final mold interpretation is not based solely on the spore count numbers. Information gathered from the visual inspection of the areas sampled is very significant, including sources of moisture or high humidity, areas of elevated particulate matter, and signs of visible mold growth.

In air samples, it is important to consider the type and concentration of fungi indoors, as compared to outdoors or a non-complaint area. We take into consideration the indoor versus outdoor fungal count ratio, the presence or absence of certain fungi indoors versus outdoors, the genus and/or species of predominant fungi indoors versus outdoors.

The indoor versus outdoor comparisons is not focused on the (absolute) concentrations, but the (relative) percentages of those small spores when doing indoor versus outdoor comparisons.

All of our testing is hypothesis-driven. Measurements of outdoor spore concentrations in the context of indoor air quality have one and only one purpose. The purpose is to test the hypothesis of whether you have an indoor source of airborne spores or not. We do this by determining if the spores in your indoor air samples may have infiltrated from outdoors at the time of testing.

If the interpretation of the results of your carefully designed sampling strategy shows that spores in the indoor samples did not come from outdoors, then there is a source of indoor spores that needs investigating and/or cleaning. The source can be from building materials or personal contents such as moldy books, moldy orange in the trash can, recent water damage, etc.

If indoor airborne spores are all from outdoors, those small spores (less than 10 microns) should be in similar percentages (doesn’t have to be identical) to those in outdoor air. They are similar in sizes, so they settle or get filtered out in similar rates. If indoor spore profiles (percentages of different spores) look very different from those found outdoors, something must have been added to the indoor air to change that profile.

The elevated air sample results have to be confirmed by the discovery of the mold growth source or the Cause and Origin of the mold growth. Without the cause and origin corrections cannot be made to return the home to an S-520 Condition 1, Normal Fungal Ecology.

Spores do not grow in the air. They grow on wet surfaces. You should always start and end with visual confirmation of the presence or absence of mold spore reservoirs, or growth, based upon a visual inspection with an understanding of where and how to find moisture problems.

Health risk from mold is not about spore counts. There is no way to associate airborne spore levels, per se, with any particular health risk (other than perhaps risk of certain types of invasive fungal infection in immune-compromised people).

We also look for the presence of hyphae fragments along with the actual spores when interpreting the lab results. The hyphae are individual filament or thread that make up a fungus and a hyphae fragment is a portion of the fungal mycelium that does not have any spores or other diagnostic fungal structures, and could not be identified but is indicative of actual fungal growth.

The final interpretation of the laboratory results are delivered in the reporting of the areas sampled as being at an S-520 Condition 1, 2, or 3 at the time of sampling.

John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
www.Microshield-ES.com


Should You Test for Mold?

March 4, 2010

When we get calls for mold testing, we conduct a very thorough client interview to help get us acquainted with the client and to help determine the client’s individual needs. In some cases the client simply needs to have air samples collected to find out if there is a presence of a known allergen in their home or office. In other cases they need to know why there is mold in their home or office and how to stop it from growing and how to get rid of what has already grown.

And far too often we are asked to interpret the laboratory report for samples that were collected by a “Mold Inspector”.

Most of the reports that we are called out to help with are incomplete and do little more that repeat what the lab report states. There were Aspergillus/Penicillium spores found etc…..etc…..

This information is of little value to the client if you don’t know what caused the mold to grow in the first place and even less value if you can’t provide a solution to that initial cause. That’s just a basic “Cause and Origin” report and requires no testing. I consider that part of my assessment as Step 1. No testing yet.

To provide the cause and origin requires a solid visual inspection which is the most important aspect of a mold inspection. The purpose of the visual inspection is to identify visual mold contamination or conditions that may be conducive to microbial growth. The visual inspection should also include the collection of indoor environmental conditions such as temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and particulate levels.

When the source of mold is hidden the use of a particulate counter is essential in locating areas of a home or office that have elevated airborne particulate matter and possible areas that require further investigation. Still no testing.

At this point I feel comfortable in my ability to answer the following questions that will become the foundation of my report.

1.Is there a mold or IAQ problem?
2.What was the cause?
3.Where is the problem source?
4.What is the extent of any wet and damaged material?
5.What building repairs are needed to prevent a reoccurrence?
6.Will I need an S-520 based protocol?
7.Will I need to provide local containment?

A mold test, surface or air, can’t answer any of those questions and would not alter the answers to any of those question. A lab report can produce a lot of information but if it doesn’t answer any of those questions why would I be testing?

If the mold testing results will not affect what you do, then you probably don’t need mold testing.

I believe that you may only need the visual inspection and a mold remediation protocol that is then followed by the testing to establish that the structure, contents or systems of your home or office have been returned to a normal fungal ecology or S-520 Condition 1.

Having said all that there are times when you may simply want to know what is in the air you breathe and whether or not there is an unusual amount of mold spores in you air. You may need to show that the mold growing on a surface is in fact airborne and causing negative health affects to the building occupants. You may want to know if the elevated particulate levels in the building are mold spores from the visible mold growth to ensure that the IAQ improvements that you recommend will address all of the airborne particulate matter and not miss something.

Remember mold tests are not perfect. False negative and false positive results do sometimes occur. Mold testing results are one piece of information, sometimes an important piece. But other pieces of information are also needed and in my mind much more important and should always take precedence over the mold testing and laboratory results.

If a mold inspector begins his inspection with the suggestion of sampling I believe I can safely say he missed a step. Step 1

In many cases that I review the only thing the mold inspector provides his client with is the laboratory report of the testing that he preformed. No summary of findings, no cause and origin, no indoor environmental measurements, no history, nothing but a lab report.

If you have signed an agreement with your inspector take a close look at it. Most if not all mold inspector agreements that I have reviewed contain a statement such as;

The client is solely responsible for the use and interpretation of the test results and reports requested from home inspector. The inspector is not able to assess the degree of any potential hazard resulting from the materials and areas analyzed. Therefore, we respectfully suggest that you review this report with your personal physician or health care person(s) for information that may affect the inhabitants of the home.

Which is sad and ironic because the laboratory report will contain a statement such as;

The Laboratory bears no responsibility for sample collection activities or analytical method limitations. Interpretation and use of test results are the responsibility of the client

Or

The client is solely responsible for the use and interpretation of these recommended action guidelines.

So who does that leave to interpret the results? What did the client pay for? How does this information help you? What is it telling you?

Many inspectors and believe that testing and sampling will somehow tell you were there is hidden mold. I just don’t believe that. There are just too many variables in air samples and spore counts to justify that statement. You still need to look for and find the mold, identify the cause and the origin, and provide a plan to repair the cause and return the home to its pre loss condition. Any good inspector should be able to do that without starting a pump.

John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
www.Microshield-ES.com


Florida Mold Law Update

March 4, 2010

Florida House Bill HB713 is a proposal to accept any national association’s certifications with 3 years verifiable experience and 60 hours of verified training. The Florida Legislature goes into session next week and this bill should be voted on quickly.

This is a very good thing for the consumer. I receive dozens of calls from consumers who have had a “Mold Inspection” only to have the inspector hand the consumer a lab report with no summary of findings. You can read more about that in this article. http://activerain.com/blogsview/1438130/the-home-inspector-mold-test-buyer-beware- That is the reason we truly need the new law and a stiff standard.

Point to remeber

Certification vs Certificate of Training

Many who hold a private, IAQ-related credential, will be surprised to learn that it may be nothing more than a training certificate.

Unfortunately there are many training programs that are not a recognized ANSI/NOCA professional certification but rather only a certificate of training. Many won’t meet the requirements of the new HB713 where you would be required to have 60hrs of training and 3 years of experience and a certification from a national association. You can read more about that in this article. http://activerain.com/blogsview/1272700/is-your-mold-or-iaq-inspector-really-certified-

Remember that HB713 is not a law yet. It still has to be voted in.

You can read more about what is in a Professional Mold Inspection Report in this article. http://activerain.com/blogsview/1516548/what-is-a-professional-and-informative-mold-report-

John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
www.Microshield-ES.com


Should I have my home tested for mold?

March 4, 2010

This is a question I get asked a lot and I find myself often posting about the subject. To clarify its not that I don’t feel that mold should be adressed, its just that I don’t believe that the flavor of the mold will change anything that takes place regarding the removal of the mold and the necessary repairs to stop the mold from growing.

I believe you should have the mold in your home assessed to determine what steps should be taken to safely remove the mold to ensure thit it wont return. When the mold inspector has completed his inspection and assessment he should be able to tell you what is causing the mold growth, how extensive the growth is, whether or not you will need a protocol, and whether or not you should contain what is there to stop the immediate exposure to you and your family until the more permanent repairs and remediation can take place.

I do believe that there are times when you should test for mold and I probably test more than these post imply but I lean much more on my visual inspection and test much less than the majority of the mold inspectors that I meet and even less than the majority of IAQ professionals that I meet. Maybe this is due to my ackground as a home builder, regardless I just don’t feel the need to depend or rely on a lab test to tell me if there is something hidden. I simply look.

I will give you a very real world example of my issues with over testing. Bear in mind that this really did happen and it happens often.

I received a call from a home buyer that had hired a mold inspector to determine if an occupied home had a mold problem. The mold inspector showed up collected two air samples in the home, one in the living room and one in the master bedroom. He also collected another air sample outside.

So far according to many this is a typical inspection for mold and most feel we are looking good. We just need to see what the results are and wala we are done. Right?

The results came back and the mold inspector told his client that the living room and master bedroom had high mold spore counts with the living room being “really high”. He wasn’t sure where the mold was growing so he wanted to return and re-sample. This time he wanted to sample every room in the home at a substantial cost. The mold inspector informed the home buyer that this sampling would determine once and for all where and in which room of the home the “hidden” mold was growing.

Again, so far a typical inspection for mold. We just need to see what the results are and wala we are done and we will know where the “hidden” mold is growing. Right?

The results came back and the mold inspector told the home buyer that the results showed nothing at all. No high spore counts and nothing inside that wasn’t outside. He then told the home buyer that he had done everything he could to help the buyer but he just didn’t know what else to do and suggest the home buyer hire a professional air quality expert.

What? Isn’t that what the home buyer hired when he hired the mold inspector?

I can tell you the home buyer told me he did in fact think he was hiring a professional mold and indoor air quality professional because that is exactly what is said on the mold inspectors website and business card.

The home buyer and now my Client sent me everything to review until I could get to the home the next day for an assessment. I received everything the mold inspector provided my Client which consisted of two laboratory reports and nothing else. Not a single photo, not a single measurement of temperature or humidity. No moisture scans of the plumbing areas of the home, no client interview, and no history of the home. Nice……..

When I got to the home I found a nice well maintained home that was occupied by a retired couple and one small dog. They had lived in the home since it was built and had never had a water intrusion event either from a typical Florida storm or from a pluming leak. No elevated particulate matter, no elevated humidity.

This was a recent inspection and there have been some real cold weeks here in Florida.

The wife had a wonderful hobby. She loved her plants. When I conducted my “Visual Inspection” I found nothing out of the ordinary with only one exception. Remember I had no idea of the conditions during the mold inspector’s inspection (sample collection) of the home.

So I asked the home owners and the home buyer if the mold inspection was during the freezing weather we had just experienced? They informed me that it actually was. I then asked if all of the plants just outside the 12 foot wide sliding glass door and inside the large screened in pool enclosure were moved inside to keep them from freezing.

The wife proudly told me she had in fact moved all of her prized plants inside including the ones in rather large pots, and she proudly informed me that she lost none to the freeze. Good for her!

I asked, to clarify, if the plants were right here in the living room during the mold inspection? The answer was yes.

The hunt for the “hidden” mold was over and the home closed with a happy seller and a happy buyer.

Cost of the first mold inspection $275

The cost of the sampling of every room in the home $1250

A good visual inspection with no sampling……… Priceless!

As far as whether or not I would want to know what type of mold I am dealing with to make some of the decisions I claim can be done visually.

I will simply quote the EPA, NYCDH, CDC, FDH, and the AIHA.

New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene
Sampling can be expensive. The results are also difficult to interpret partially because we have very limited information about what level of mold exposure is associated with health effects. In some cases, knowing the type of mold that is present can be helpful, but for most cases, sampling is unnecessary. Overall, the best practice regardless of the type or amount of mold is to promptly clean up any mold growth in your home and to correct the water problem that caused it.

Any extensive indoor mold growth should be treated as a potential health concern and removed as soon as practical no matter what species of mold is present. Identify and correct the source of moisture so that mold will not grow back.
http://www.health.state.ny.us/environmental/indoors/air/mold.htm

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Generally, it is not necessary to identify the species of mold growing in a residence, and CDC does not recommend routine sampling for molds. Current evidence indicates that allergies are the type of diseases most often associated with molds. Since the susceptibility of individuals can vary greatly either because of the amount or type ofmold, sampling and culturing are not reliable in determining your health risk. If you are susceptible to mold and mold is seen or smelled, there is a potential health risk; therefore, no mold what type of mold is present, you should arrange for its removal.
http://www.cdc.gov/mold/faqs.htm

Florida Department of Health
Indoor mold growth can usually be seen or smelled. In most cases, if visible mold growth is present, sampling is not needed. There are no health or exposure-based standards that you can use to evaluate a mold sampling result. The Florida Department of Health does not recommend mold testing or sampling to see if you have a mold problem, or to see what kind of mold might be growing.
http://www.doh.state.fl.us/ENVIRONMENT/COMMUNITY/indoor-air/mold.htm

American Industrial Hygiene Association
Should I test my home for mold? Probably not. Looking for evidence of water damage and visible mold growth should be your first step. Testing for mold is expensive, and you should have a clear reason for doing so. In addition, there are no standards for “acceptable” levels of mold in the indoor environment. When testing is done, it is usually to compare the levels and types of mold spores found inside the home with those found outdoors. If you know you have a mold problem, it is more important to spend time and resources getting rid of the mold and solving the moisture problem causing the moldy conditions.
http://www.aiha.org/news-pubs/newsroom/Documents/Facts%20about%20Mold.pdf

John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
www.Microshield-ES.com


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