IESO Rescinds Section of Standard

January 30, 2011

IAQA E-News

The Board of Directors of the Indoor Environmental Standards Organization (IESO) voted to rescind Section 2 of IESO’s Standard of Practice for the Assessment of Indoor Environment Quality, 2nd Edition, 2003. Acting within its proper authority, the IESO rescinded Sections 2210 and 2110 since they were not originally developed following ANSI Essential Requirements.

•John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
•Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
•Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
www.Microshield-ES.com


The EPA Cracks Down

January 30, 2011

From Wonder Makers Environmental

The EPA has begun enforcement of the new Renovation Repair and Painting (RRP) regulation. For a window replacement company in the Midwest, this new regulation came at a hefty cost. The company was fined $70,000 for failing to hand out Renovate Right brochures to its homeowner customers ($35,000 for non-compliance; $35,000 for willful violation).

Another window contractor in Michigan was cited with a $784,380 fine for failing to warn the tenants of 271 residential units of possible lead exposure during construction activities. Business owners are responsible for the requirements of all regulatory agencies that have rules concerning the work they do.

•John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
•Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
•Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
www.Microshield-ES.com


Hotel Deadline for RIA Convention Approaching

January 30, 2011

Restoration Industry Association

The deadline for making your reservations at The Broadmoor in Colorado Springs for RIA’s Leadership Summit and Industry Expo is Monday, February 7th. With the cost to attend the event is the lowest it’s been in 10 years, rooms will be going fast, so make sure to book ASAP. The early registration price is $400 for the first attendee and $300 for each additional one, and includes 2 full breakfasts and lunches, education sessions, exhibition hall access and two evening receptions. Register for the convention here before the February 21st early-bird deadline.

This is a great place to pick up several continuing education credits, particularly for those who hold RIA Certifications and need to attend one RIA event within their 3-year cycle.

This will be RIA’s only convention-style event this year, since there will not be a traditional “Fall Conference” as done in the past. There will be a two-day Striclty Contents Conference in Chicago on September 15-16. More details to come…

•John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
•Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
•Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
www.Microshield-ES.com


Count Down to IAQA Annual Meeting & Indoor Air Expo

January 30, 2011

With just three weeks left until the IAQA 14th Annual Meeting & Indoor Air Expo, the buzz is building throughout the industry. IAQA’s line-up of speakers includes key representatives from government and industry, with more than 30 educational sessions and panel discussions to choose from. See the full program of events below. The Indoor Air Expo, co-produced by IAQA, the Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA), and the Radiant Professionals Alliance (RPA) features nearly 200 exhibitors. Click to see the exhibitor list and interactive expo floor plan: Indoor Air Expo.

It’s not too late to register for the IAQA 14th Annual Meeting & Indoor Air Expo, taking place in San Antonio, Texas from February 15-17. Click the convention banner at the bottom of this email to get travel information, registration forms and other essential information. See you in Texas!

•John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
•Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
•Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
www.Microshield-ES.com


CDRAC Committee Meeting Reports and Summary Online

January 30, 2011

The Code Development Review Ad-Hoc Committee (CDRAC), charged with reviewing Member feedback regarding—and addressing critical issues impacting—the Code Council’s current code development procedures, posted all four committee reports and a summary of CDRAC Recommendations online. The CDRAC’s final meeting, which is open to Members and stakeholders, is planned for February 3-4 in Rosemont, Illinois.

•John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
•Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
•Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
www.Microshield-ES.com


RIA Announces Presentations for 2011 Leadership Summit

January 30, 2011

Columbia, MD – The Restoration Industry Association (RIA) has given its annual convention and exhibition a major facelift and will be unveiling some of those changes at The Broadmoor in Colorado Springs. The Leadership Summit and Industry Expo will take place from March 8-11 and will feature four facilitated discussion forums on several different hot topic themes that encompass a host of different subjectS:

Management in Today’s Challenging World – lean management, personnel issues, today’s technology

Covering Your Assets – risk assessment, legal issues in restoration, lead-safe practices

Opportunity Knocking in a Deficit-Laden Economy – new revenue streams, distinguishing your company from the competition, social media marketing

Spend More Time Planning Your Vacation Than Customer Service? – defining the industry’s customers, setting and exceeding customer expectations, providing world class customer service

“RIA has a reputation for providing new ideas, trends and concepts at its Convention,” said RIA President Frank Headen, CR, WLS, CMH. “These expanded sessions allow attendees to determine what topics are important to them and gather information from the leading cleaning and restoration professionals from around the world.”

There will also be two keynote presentations. Evan Marcus of Dillon Marcus Executive Retreats will address the “Wisdom of We” and the importance of “inter-dependence” in today’s business environment. Ted Garrison of Garrison & Associates takes a look at “An Industry in Turmoil: Trends to a Restoration Turnaround.”

Eight other 90-minute break-out sessions will tackle the topics of: job costing analysis, organizing for tomorrow’s business, “leed” vs. “green” certifications, RIA’s Phoenix Award winners, restoring contents, a review of Xactware’s 2010 annual property report, transitioning the family restoration business to the next generation, and how to become a “restoration survivor.”

For more information or to register, visit http://www.restorationindustry.org.

•John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
•Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
•Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
www.Microshield-ES.com


New Book Advocates Chemical-Free Cleaning

January 30, 2011

A newly published book by Vince Elliott, BS, MHS, describes how facilities can now be cleaned thoroughly, hygienically, at less cost, and with greater work productivity without the use of chemical cleaning agents.
New Book Advocates Chemical-Free Cleaning

The book, Extreme Green Cleaning, was introduced in November at the 2010 ISSA/INTERCLEAN North America trade show in Orlando.

In it, Elliott writes that the professional cleaning industry is moving beyond conventional or green cleaning chemicals to emerging technologies that use plain tap water instead of chemicals.

“This is what I call renewable, ‘chemical-free cleaning,'” says Elliott. “It means no cleaning residues are left on surfaces or in the air after cleaning.”

Elliott argues that even though green cleaning chemicals are safer for users and the environment, “they still are chemicals. The typical [American] office building is using approximately 1,600 pounds of these chemicals each year, dumping about six billion pounds of chemicals into our environment annually.”

Instead, Elliott suggests employing these effective alternatives:
Activated water systems, which use electrical currents to turn tap water into a powerful disinfectant

Electrolyzed water systems, which are used for scrubbing and cleaning floors

The no-touch cleaning system, which is considered a “sanitizing device” based on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria*
“Chemical-free cleaning may have caught some people by surprise because it has been evolving so slowly,” adds Elliott. “But it is here and growing and will prove to be one of the most significant trends in our industry in years to come.”

Elliott’s book may be purchased through Amazon.com .

*Applies only to certain models of the no-touch cleaning system developed by Kaivac, Inc. Cleaning must be performed as directed, with water only, and no chemicals or cleaning agents. The EPA classifies a “sanitizing device” as any system that reduces the number of microbes on a test surface by 99.9 percent.

For more information, visit http://www.ealtd.com or http://www.cfcn.info .

•John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
•Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
•Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
www.Microshield-ES.com


“FREE” Mold Inspection & Mold Testing “MOLD SCAM”

January 25, 2011

When it comes to mold, the general public knows little to nothing other than what they read on the internet or hear from someone who makes money selling mold-related products or services.

Most people who call a mold inspector or mold removal contractor are not really sure if they have a mold problem or not. Maybe they smell something, maybe they had a toilet back up in the past, or had a flood. Perhaps they’re experiencing some unexplained health condition that they believe might be caused by mold growing in their home.

It’s one thing to know for certain that you have a mold problem, but quite another to not know for sure. And between the ‘not knowing’ and all the hype and scare tactics that are used to sell mold services (both inspections and remediation), it’s only natural for people to be somewhat ‘fearful’ when they call a mold removal company.

Fear is a powerful motivator and many unscrupulous mold contractors are masters at playing the fear card to create a sense of urgency in order to motivate you sign a contract right away. That is not to say that all mold remediation contractors are unscrupulous.

There are many excellent consultants and contractors out there. But in these slow economic times, it is wise to beware of anyone using words like; “FREE MOLD INSPECTION”, “FREE CONSULTATION”, “FREE TESTING”, and “FREE SAMPLES” in their pitch.

More often than not, free comes with a hefty price that ends up costing far more than you thought it would and never has that been more true than in the mold business.

How To Avoid It:
Make sure your Mold Inspector is Licensed by the State and ensure that your mold inspector is not your mold remediator.

The safest thing consumers can do whenever the word “FREE” is used to sell a mold remediation job is to avoid that contractor all together.

Think about it. No one is in business to do anything for free.

Anyone offering something for free is doing so to sell you something else.

While that may be fine when it comes to “buy one – get one free” deals offered on TV infomercials, in the mold business a free inspections and testing can end up costing you thousands of dollars for remediation work that may be grossly exaggerated or in some cases doesn’t need to be done at all.

Most importantly it’s against the Law in the State of Florida to provide mold assessment ans remediation on the same job.

•John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
•Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
•Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
www.Microshield-ES.com www.CFL-IAQ.com


The Cost of Good Air

January 23, 2011

In 1984, the World Health Organization Committee said up to 30 percent of new and remodeled buildings worldwide have complaints related to indoor air quality. Florida is no exception.

In the subtropics of the state’s coastal areas, cooling and removing the humidity from the air inside buildings and preventing mold buildup is a year-round battle that has come with a big price tag.

For instance, Sebastian officials spent more than $250,000 to remove carpets, replace walls and rework air-circulating equipment at their Police Department headquarters. The city of Rockledge paid $88,000 last year to replenish the air quality in its fire station.

Between 1997 and 2001, the Brevard County School District spent more than $19 million to revamp, clean and replace air-conditioning systems in its offices and area schools. That doesn’t include projects involving roofs, doors or windows that impact indoor quality, nor the ongoing maintenance of air conditioning equipment.

“There are a large number of buildings that date back to the mid-1960s. It’s a challenge to take 1960s technology with air conditioning and yet continue to provide good air quality,” said Richard Smith, indoor air quality control coordinator for the district.

He said air-conditioning systems represent the largest unfunded need in ongoing school maintenance programs. “It’s always the largest chunk of our 5- or 10-year plans,” he said.

Greg Smith, assistant superintendent of operations for Indian River County schools, said the district is spending about $1 million to revamp the air-conditioning system at Thompson Elementary School in Vero Beach.
Last year, the district did similar work at Highlands Elementary and Sebastian River Middle School.

Also, the Indian River County Commission recently decided to build a new municipal building, in part because of the poor air conditioning and circulation system.

“We want to address air quality concerns in the development of plans for a new building. That’s also why the Space Needs Committee has recommended an open-office design to prevent stagnant areas,” said Tom Frame, county general services supervisor.
Written by: Linda Jump

•John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
•Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
•Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
www.Microshield-ES.com


Sick-Building Complaints On Rise

January 23, 2011

Written by: Linda Jump, Florida Today

Cities attempt to get air quality under control in their offices.

Shortly after former Sebastian police Chief Dennis “Randy” White moved into his office at the city’s Police Department in 1996, he developed a constant nasal drip in the back of his throat and a dry cough.

His doctor diagnosed allergies but then he started to hear co-workers’ complaints of similar symptoms, conditions they said seemed to improve when they were out of the building during weekends or vacations.

Then White watched a 10-inch plant grow out of a wall in the department and wind around the window. Afterwards, he discovered dark mold behind a picture on his office wall. “The building wasn’t right,” he said, adding that mold and mildew problems persisted in the building despite city officials’ efforts to fix it.

White and eight others at the department filed worker’s compensation claims, arguing the building made them sick, and recently received out-of-court settlements.

The Sebastian police station isn’t the only municipal building that has been touched with mold problems or poor air circulation. An increasing number of government buildings in Central Florida are facing complaints of “sick building syndrome,” a general classification for worker ailments from dizziness and headaches to upper respiratory ailments.

A report last year found six federal courthouses in Central Florida, including Orlando and Ocala, were contaminated with mold and other fungi, leaving workers with high rates of illnesses and breathing problems.

The complaints can lead to costly lawsuits and worker’s compensation claims, which some local governments are trying to head off by fixing problems now.
Rockledge, for instance, closed one of its fire stations for weeks last December to rid it of mold and beef up air quality after several firemen got sick.

Other local and state governments throughout the United States have taken measures to keep the air quality in offices high while reducing the occurrences of mold and mildew. But the preventative and corrective measures aren’t cheap.
Some municipalities have had to shell out big bucks to ensure their buildings are up to standard. Others have still had to pay the medical bills for workers who have exhibited ongoing symptoms.

•John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
•Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
•Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
www.Microshield-ES.com


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